Category Archives: Cthulhu

Casting Cthulhu

Many eons ago (mid 2012), I sculpted a statue that I thought would be a bit of fun, would end up on my shelf and never be touched again. Cthulhu. Originally I wanted to make a Deep One statue but I couldn’t come up with a nice design I liked so ended up making the big chap based on the description from the Call of Cthulhu story.

After making it, I thought “How could I cast this up? Can’t be that hard, I’ve done some before at uni.” and so I went for a browse round my local craft shop. All I could find there was latex which is a good enough casting material so I bought a big bottle of the stuff and set to.

It took weeks.

Honestly, latex is one of the slowest ways to make a mould. Its also one of the smelliest. The sulpher released was making my eyes water.

Its a case of layer, upon layer brushed on but you have to wait until its dry before putting the next layer on and that can take hours. I was layering it up with thickener as well to get some of the thickness once the first few base layers had been put on.

And so, the first few Cthulhu (Cthulhii? What do you call a group of Cthulhu) arrived via the latex mould.

Cthulhu statues

It was very hard to get them out of the mould. Latex doesn’t stretch very much so it was tough demoulding them.

During the following year I made another Latex one and then started to try out other materials for making moulds. At some point I tried Dragon Skin from SmoothOn which is silicone that can be used for either mould or casting.

Latex, latex, dragon skin and dragon skin.

Apart from the toughness to stretch the latex moulds, they had started to corrode from the heat when you pour the resin in. The Dragon Skin is far stretchier and can take a bit more punishment.

The first Dragon Skin mould was made in 2013 and the second was made in 2015 and is finally starting to give up. Bits come away in the fine detail areas and it becomes harder to remove the casting so I knew it was time to make a new one. Four years is a pretty good run for something that gets used a lot.

Over a couple of hours, one Sunday, I made a new mould by layering up Dragon Skin over the casting. As it flows quite freely, its great for getting into all the nooks and crannies but it does mean it runs everywhere. It takes a few layers to get a good thickness and you hae to apply it as its nearly set. Another thing is to make sure there are no big air pockets in overhanging areas.

After 24 hours to fully cure the mould peeled off easily, ready for the first casting.

It does look odd inside out…

The Cthulhu statue is available in my Etsy shop in a different range of finishes such as bronze, copper and green.

Fleshy Friends – Fleshy Cthulhu

I’m on a roll now, two projects written up and a new one today. Its like a really bad Christmas. Next up is a project that I loved working on because it was quite different from anything I’d done up until now. This is a Fleshy Cthulhu statue based on a design by one of the chaps I met while visiting Bristol to drop off the Gavin army. His blog is called Fleshy Friends and has some insane designs.

Fleshy Cthulhu lives

Fleshy Cthulhu

There are those who don’t like cute Cthulhu items (me being one) and I have to agree that theres a lot of chaff out there which has a cute face and a few tentacles. What I love about the Fleshy Friends designs is that they look like something out of a David Cronenberg film. This Cthulhu design looks like it should be cute but isn’t and i wouldn’t want to cuddle it. A bit like naked cats, very unheimlich.

Working with the design, I first sculpted the body and tentacles as two seperate pieces to make the casting stage easier.

Cthulhu

Checking they fit correctly when roughly held together.

Cthulhu

Cthulhu

Then with an updated design, I added a base.

Cthulhu statue with base

Cthulhu based

I also had to tweak the mouth area a little.

Cthulhu baked and primed

Baked and primed, he was now ready for casting. The bit in the chest was for the jewel to be pixed in place once cast and painted.

Cthulhu ready for casting

Theres a video on my Facebook page of me pouring the silicone but this is the end result. Two slabs of silicone.

slabs of silicone

I hate cutting moulds. It seems like you spend all this time and money only to slice the damn thing up.

Cthulhu

They came out ok though when the resin was poured.

Cthulhu

Clones of Cthulhu.

Cthulhu

Then a few more got cast and painted.

Cthulhu painted

The blue jewel in the chest is a clear plastic gem that is sprayed with a paint that is for stained glass. Its the same paint I used to colour the engines on my Galactica kit.

And they’re now available in my Etsy shop.

Some more pictures of the final piece along with some WIPs are available for your perusal.

Casting Cthulhu

I’ve been asked a few times over the last couple of weeks how I actually mould and cast my statues. So rather than do a project update blog, I’m going to talk a little about how I cast my statues using (appropriately enough) a brass Cthulhu that I cast last weekend.

Before I actually start yammering, I’m going to do another quick link to my Facebook page Castings of Cthulhu and remind you that I’ll be posting updates and random stuff on there on a more regular basis. I’ll be using the blog for posting finished projects and bigger updates.

Ok, shameless self promotion done, lets move on…

When I first cast something many years ago in art college, I used plaster which was messy and not very good for details and then moved onto Vinamold at uni. Vinamold is a rubbery material you heat up and smells vaguely of chicken soup (as I remember) and is reusable so it has some good points if you like chicken soup. Skipping on 15+ years takes us to the point where I hadn’t cast anything in ages but wanted to start casting my Cthulhu. After a wander around the local craft shop I left with a big bottle of latex and a small bottle of latex thickener. This was for the very first Cthulhu mould and I spent a couple of weeks layering latex over the original.

The first few castings where pretty disastrous as I attempted to figure out what the hell I was doing, to the point of dumping £30 worth of bronze powder into the mould with a load of resin and it going horribly wrong. It was a bit of a downer but I’ve slowly managed to refine my technique over the last few years. Not to say everything comes out perfect, but every casting helps me figure out new things and I get it right more often than not now.

lots_o_moulds

From left to right we have the first mould in latex, the second mould also in latex, the third mould in Dragon Skin and the fourth (and current mould) in erm… Dragon skin as well. I think. Probably. Pretty sure it is anyway. There is one missing between two and three which was from a private commission for a Cthulhu in a green stone effect. I tried to use a material with stone in it which pretty much thrashed the mould but I think it was a cockup on my part more than the materials used. I think I miss calculated the ratio of resin to stone and it ended up a slightly crumbly Cthulhu. I just binned the mould in the end as the inside was shredded.

This is the insides of the Cthulhu latex mould.

rubber_mould cthulhu

Cthulhu Dragon skin mould.

dragon_skin cthulhu

and the other one which is probably Dragon Skin. I’m 99% sure its Dragon Skin… well… 95%.

coloured_mould cthulhu

The original latex moulds are still in pretty good shape. The first one has a couple of rips starting to appear as one downside with latex is how little it stretches. Don’t get me wrong, its rubber, it bends and flexes but when you’re trying to peel a skin tight rubber mould from a statue of a great old one, you want something that has a little give in it. A few times I came close to just cutting the moulds and being done with as my fingers would be hurting and I’d be sweating trying to get it off the damn casting. So I did some reading and ended up getting some of Dragon Skin FX-Pro from Bentley. This stuff is wonderful and I now swear by it for my one piece jacket moulds (I’m mainly using Oomoo for my two part moulds and thats also by Smooth-On).

The whitish clear mould was made in a weekend and I made the mistake of not using any pigment in the material which meant it was hard to see where I had applied it, hence why the fourth mould is coloured. Its much easier to see where its been layered on. Dragon skin is applied in layers, like latex, but where latex takes a day or so to dry (the ammonia evaporating) this stuff can be layered up in 45-60 minutes before its fully set. Meaning most moulds can be made in a day and dragon skin stretches like you wouldn’t believe. You can pull it 200%+ of the original item so demoulding is much easier.

So once the mould is done, its time to fill it with something. I’ll just backtrack a small amount and add something about mother moulds. Smallish items can be cast as they are in the mould but bigger items need a mother mould around the main mould to hold its shape. Mother moulds are rigid outer shells that support that floppy inner mould as when you fill the mould, it will sag and bend unless it has something to hold it in place. I’m currently using Plastipaste for most of my mother moulds (it’s by Smooth-On, spotting a pattern yet?) and comes out looking a bit like expanding spray foam only rock hard.

OK, so we have our mould and its snuggled up inside the mother mould, its time to fill it with something. Well, not just yet. Spraying the inside of the mould with some form of release spray is useful at this point.

cups_and_release

I’m not going to point out what make my current spray release is, suffice to say that I get it from Bentley Materials where I get my moulding materials from.

A light spray inside the mould and inside the moulding cups. Yup, it helps to recycle the measuring cups when the resin has set as you can pop the waste resin out and save it for later. While its not vital to have a release spray for moulds, it does help to save on wear and tear.

OK, now we can fill it with something. This is Easy Flow clear…

easy_flo_clear

…and this is brass powder in the Easy Flow Clear.

brass_in_resin

Depending on the casting, I put a specific amount of part A in one cup and the same amount of part B in another cup and then mix the same volume of metal into each cup, mix them up in the cup and then mix the two cups together. Odins, Freyjas and Thors all use the same volumes while Cthulhu takes a much larger amount. Easy Flow sets fast so after mixing together its time to pour it into the mould and roll that thing around to make sure every part of it is coated. I have experimented with just dusting the insides of moulds with metal powder and then pouring the resin in but I’ve never had satisfactory results to be honest.

So now we have a thin layer of Easy Flow and metal powder glooping around coating the insides and after about five minutes the Easy Flow is set enough to leave to fully cure.

brass_in_mould

We now have to fill the void. Remember that mould release we sprayed into the cups? Once the Easy Flow has set we can pull the bit thats set at the bottom out and drop it into the gap along with any other materials we have to hand to help back fill the hole.

This is Polycraft 7450 that I get from mbfg.co.uk and is a nice cheap back fill resin that I mix with black dye and either Aluminium Trihydrate or Fillite to help bulk out the resin. When I first started to cast these I was using Marine grade fibreglass resin as I could get it cheaply, but the stench meant I had to do them outside and also they got really really hot when curing. The volume of resin poured into the hollow Cthulhu meant there was often jets of steam coming off them and the rubber got really dark from heating up. Even filling in stages didn’t help a lot so I quickly shifted onto stuff with no smell (everything I use these days is pretty much odourless) and doesn’t get too warm.

back_fill

Backfilling helps to keep the production cost down as well as the weight for shipping. If I was to fill with either solid resin or anything else then the shipping costs would go through the roof. Anything over 2kg is a shocking price to send signed for overseas from the UK, so in the interest of actually being able to stock Cthulhu at a price that people would be willing to pay for shipping, I try to keep the weight down.

side_by_side

Demoulded the castings look quite dull, so it’s time to hit them up with some metal polish and fine grade wire wool. The outer layer of the casting has a layer of resin which needs to be removed. I use firegrate polish on my casting to help age them and brush them all over with the stuff before buffing with wire wool then buffing with a cloth and the difference is noticeable. Firegrate polish has a high percentage of graphite in which helps to darken down the casting and also sinks into the deeper recesses of the casting giving it an appearance of aged metal. You can mix raw graphite powder into the metal powder at the casting stage but it has to be worked out carefully or else you end up with a very dark finish.

Once the polishing is done I base the Cthulhu with felt to save them from scuffing whatever surface they end up on. One early customer ordered one for his garden so I skipped the felt on that one.

basing_cthulhu

So thats pretty much it. It’s a very broad overview with warts and all and isn’t intended to be an in-depth guide, but if anyone has questions then please ask away in the comments below or on Facebook and I’ll do my best to answer them.